Saturday, November 9, 2019

Episode One: Welcome to JLG® Boot Camp


Complying with the new ANSI standards isn’t easy, but it’s necessary. When four recruits show up to boot camp, Sgt. McConnell lays out exactly what they need to learn before the March 2020 deadline. Watch the full miniseries to ensure you’ll be ANSI compliant in time.

Wednesday, November 6, 2019

CRANE FORKS



Crane Forks with backstop
Model 660 Frame shown with
Model 660-01 General Purpose Tines
Simpler Design - No cables or pulleys
Crane Fork FRAME w/backstop Model 660 Frame only - Select Tines below.
Model 660 w/Model 660-02 Block Tines




Model 660 Frame shown with Model 660-02 Block Tines

Self Shifting (spring loaded) Pickup Trolley

    ♦  Keeps forks level even when empty
    ♦  Maintains payload center of gravity to keep load level

Design Features

    ♦  King post adjusts for load heights from 42" to 65"
    ♦  Adjustable stop permits use of 36", 40" & 48" pallets
    ♦  Backstop helps stabilize load - 40" wide
    ♦  Forks spread up 40" wide (out to out)

Call i80 Forklift for more information:  (707) 451-5100
(707) 451-5100

Sunday, November 3, 2019

JLG Training Center & Proving Grounds


A four-acre operator training area that recreates a working construction job site. A virtual equipment simulator to help students get familiar with equipment controls. See this and more at JLG’s expanded customer training center in McConnellsburg, Pa.

Thursday, October 31, 2019

What’s the Difference Between ANSI & OSHA?



ANSI (American National Standards Institute) and OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) both set standards that govern the access industry. Learn the difference between these organizations in this video.

Friday, October 25, 2019

Advanced Life Cycle Solutions


Watch this video recap to follow the story of how JLG delivers lower total cost of ownership at every level, from customer-focused R&D to single source parts.
http://www.jlg.com/

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

TRUCK DRIVER NEEDED

WANTED: Class A Truck Driver

Hauling Construction Equipment in Northern and Central California
CONTACT: I80 Forklift, Vacaville CA
Call: 707-451-5100
Clean California DMV Record Required

Saturday, October 19, 2019

How Wearables Will Improve Construction Safety

Construction worker using wearable technology

We live in an age of data. Every website we visit, item we purchase and address we program into our GPS is recorded, usually with the goal of improving our experience. But, what if we could leverage the power of data to keep workers safer on the job? That’s where wearables come in.

Benefits
The main benefit of wearable sensors in construction is that they can help reduce a worker’s risk of injury or stress. They do this by monitoring vital signs like heart rate, skin temperature, oxygen levels and even electrical activity on the skin. It then alerts the worker if a potentially dangerous level was recorded. Some wearables may even sense the environment around the worker and sound a safety alarm if a situation becomes dangerous.

Because wearables are small—a wristband or chest band, for example—they are less intrusive. They allow managers to evaluate workers’ health and safety in real time without relying on people to manually report their status. This proactive monitoring can help to prevent dangerous situations and allow work to be performed with less risk.

Another possible benefit is reduced insurance rates. While this is a new technology, some insurance companies may offer discounts to organizations that adopt wearables as a tool to keep workers safer.

Potential Challenges
Wearable sensors collect data about a person’s physical and mental state. Therefore, privacy can become a concern. Before implementing wearable technology, companies must put a policy in place to determine what data will be available to management and what will be kept private.

Workers—particularly people who have been in the construction industry for years—may be less receptive to adding this new technology to their work day. It’s important to get buy-in from people at all levels of your organization and to show them how adopting wearable sensing technology will improve construction safety and health.

Want to stay up to date with industry news and trends similar to this? Make sure you subscribe below to receive monthly updates from Direct Access with newly posted content so you never miss important information. 

Read Safety Tip

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

HEAVY DUTY TRASH HOPPERS

Designed for "extendable reach" forklifts



Ideal for . . .

    General jobsite trash
    handling.
    Drop from masonry saw
    brick & block cutting.
    Rehab Projects.
    Re-roofing Jobs.
    Even as an elevating
    platform for material
    and equipment.

Forklift Trash Hopper

Make Cleanup as Simple as...1,  2,  3

    ① Forklift places hoppers where they are needed - on the floor, elevated deck, or roof.
    ② Workmen load them up as work progress's.
    ③ When the hopper is full, the forklift picks it up and carries it to the disposal area to dump - simple and convenient!

Easy-To-Load Design
Front completely open for unrestricted access.
Material can be . . .
• Wheeled in with wheelbarrows.
• Dumped from power buggies.
• Loaded by compact loaders.
• Thrown in by hand.
Rugged All Steel Construction
• Durable 3/16" plate steel for shell and sides.
• Full length fork channels add strength to bottom and assure the correct forklift pick-up points.
• Edges and corners are heavily reinforced for
   greater strength and rigidity.
Universal Fit
• Fits most all forklifts - slip on forks design
• Fork Pockets accept forks up to: 2 ¾" thick x 7
   wide x 60" long
• Attaches fast and easy to forklift with simple pin
   locking system.
Cleaner and Safer
• Eliminates dust and airborne material
   associated with chutes and slides.
• Eliminates dangers associated with trash
   being dumped directly from elevated decks.
information box for trash hoppers

Find out more at:(707) 451-5100
http://i80forklift.com/ 

Sunday, October 13, 2019

Long Material Can Be Handled Easily and More Safely with a Heavy Duty Spreader Bar



A safe and convenient attachment for handling rebar and rebar cages. A popular attachment with metal building erectors. Used for handling long metal building beams as well as sheet metal roofing and siding. Universal Fit - “slip-on-forks” - Designed for use with rough terrain forklifts, either straight mast or extendable reach. It comes equipped with fork pockets that will accept up to 7” wide x 3” thick forks.

Learn more at: http://starindustries.com/

Thursday, October 10, 2019

Save Time and Money with the JLG® Bolt-On Fall Arrest System



Work 180o around and up to 6 ft away from your boom lift platform with the new Bolt-On Fall Arrest System from JLG. A cost-effective alternative to buying a whole new boom platform, this system consists of two large steel brackets securing a 6-ft cable with a ring that can move from one end of the cable to the other. Attaching the lanyard to the ring improves maneuverability and allows the operator to perform tasks outside of the platform.

Learn more: https://www.jlg.com/en/news-events/pr...

Monday, October 7, 2019

Episode One: Welcome to JLG® Boot Camp


Complying with the new ANSI standards isn’t easy, but it’s necessary. When four recruits show up to boot camp, Sgt. McConnell lays out exactly what they need to learn before the December 2019 deadline. Watch the full miniseries to ensure you’ll be ANSI compliant in time. Explore JLG® Boot Camp infographics, guides and other resources at https://www.jlg.com/en/destination/ansi

Friday, October 4, 2019

Expansive Inventory of Telehandlers, Boom Lifts and Light Towers at I80 Forklift

pink_ribbon.jpg
Interstate 80 Forklift, Inc.
70 Union Way, Vacaville, CA 95687
707-451-5100

Based in Solano County, centrally located between the Bay Area and Sacramento, Interstate 80 Forklift is your top choice for all your needs.

Did you know...
  • We have an expansive fleet of telehandlers for sell or rent
  • We have an expansive fleet of boom lifts, scissor lifts and light towers for sell or rent
  • We sell and rent small utility trailers with a drop deck
  • We rent an Under-Bridge Platform
  • We employ experienced and certified mechanics to work on your equipment on-site or in our shop
  • We will transport your heavy construction equipment anywhere within California
  • We offer forklift, boom lift and scissor lift certification classes at our Vacaville location or your jobsite
  • We have most commonly used or needed parts on-hand ready to ship to you or be installed
  • We have Safety Equipment for your jobsite needs
  • We do annual boom and scissor lift inspections
  • We do preventative maintenance on all construction equipment
  • We are Small Business Certified through the State of California (SBE# 1351740)

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

A Day in the Life of a Genie® Intern


What is a day in the life of a Genie® intern like? Learn about what you can experience in an internship at Genie.

Friday, September 27, 2019

Vote I-80 Forklift For Best of Solano County 2019


Please vote for us in Best Of Solano County 2019. We are qualified under 2 categories: 1. Professional Services 2. Heavy Equipment Rental Use this link to submit your vote today: https://thereporter.secondstreetapp.c... See more at http://www.i80forklift.com or call 707-451-5100.

Wednesday, September 25, 2019

Full Product Walk-Around: SX™-135 XC Telescopic Boom Intro - ANSI


The Genie® SX-135 XC™ self-propelled telescopic boom delivers industry-leading outreach and capacity through the full working envelope for incredible operational versatility and accessibility. 

The SX-135 XC model is the perfect choice for your customers to work on challenging jobsite applications while giving you the quality and reliability you have come to expect from Genie.

Check out more information about the SX-135 XC at: http://www.genielift.com/en/products/....

Sunday, September 22, 2019

Safe Use Standard

 


 ANSI A92.22 & CSA B354.7

This standard governs the safe use of MEWPs by specifying proper application, inspection, training, maintenance, repair and safe operation. One of the main requirements is developing a safe use program to guide MEWP use as it relates to job site safety.

Whats Changed

Step 1:
To develop an effective safe use program that complies with new requirements, it’s important to perform a site risk assessment before starting a job. This assessment should:
  • Define the task, location and timing of the work
  • Inform MEWP selection
  • Evaluate MEWP-related, job-specific and additional risks
  • Identify controls like proper training and rescue planning

Step 2: Once a safety plan has been developed, it should be shared with everyone who will be on site during the work. The updated standards outline new requirements for many roles as they relate to a safe use program.
  • Operator: Is trained and authorized to operate the MEWP
  • Occupant: Has knowledge of MEWP use and safety, including fall protection systems
  • Supervisor: Monitors use of MEWP to ensure safety plan is followed
  • Technician: Performs MEWP maintenance in line with manufacturer’s requirements
Learn more at:  https://www.jlg.com/en/destination/ansi/safe-use

Thursday, September 19, 2019

Looking beyond ladders

 Why are low-level access products gaining in popularity as a means of fall protection?

 JLG-Fall-Protection-Image.jpg


Low-level access products are gaining popularity over ladders for one main reason – safety. This category of lifts is a safer alternative to ladders, scaffolding and other forms of access. In addition, these machines enhance productivity, promote efficiency and provide environmental benefits that are increasingly of interest to operators and building owners.

The use and popularity of low-level access lifts are growing for several reasons. One is that operators can use both hands comfortably to do work safely at height, 360 degrees around. This isn’t the case with ladders, where workers often must use one hand to stabilize themselves at height, leaving only one hand free to perform a task.

This equipment also features portability benefits. Low-level access equipment can be lowered and moved from one location to another, making it easy to perform multiple tasks throughout a facility in less time. In addition, some solutions can be operated with a cordless 18-volt drill, while others are powered by a 40-volt, lithium-ion battery that allows for smooth, cord-free operation.

Another benefit of low-level access lifts is that they can maneuver easily through standard doorways or standard double doorways. The personal portable lifts can be assembled and disassembled in minutes with two people and require little storage space when not in use. A benefit to being able to disassemble the lifts is that the pieces can be carried to previously inaccessible parts of a building. For example, if someone needs to complete work in an area accessible only by stairs, they can disassemble the lift, carry the pieces up or down the stairs, and then reassemble. Additionally, because the lifts are telescopic, they can fit into the back of a truck or van.

The non-powered realm of low-level access lifts includes models that feature a patented stored power lift system that requires no batteries, hydraulics, oil or controls. Because no hydraulics or motors are involved, these eco-friendly lifts are leak-free and operate quietly, making them a preferred piece of equipment for work in schools, hospitals and other institutions. In the interest of reduced environmental influence, these units also include non-marking wheels that minimize the impact on sensitive flooring.

It’s also important to note that low-level access helps with worker fatigue. With ladders, a worker must climb up and down to get the tools he or she needs. It can be exhausting work and can lead to an increased risk of falls or injuries. However, low-level access offers trays to rest tools on to get the work done quickly without a lot of moving up and down. If a worker needs to secure another tool, it’s as easy as moving a lift mechanism or pressing a button to ascend and descend.

Editor's note: This article represents the independent views of the author and should not be construed as a National Safety Council endorsement.

Friday, September 13, 2019

Operator Training Introduction - Gradall Highway Speed Excavators


This is Part 1 in the Gradall Highway Speed Excavators Operator Training Video, focusing on General Safety Practices. This is a 5-part training video.

Tuesday, September 10, 2019

Product Introduction: Genie® GS™-1330m Scissor Lift - ANSI



The Genie® GS™-1330m scissor lift offers a maximum platform height of 12.8 ft (3.9 m) and a maximum working height of 18.8 ft (5.9 m), with a 2-person, 500-lb (227 kg) capacity and weighing in at only 1,950 lb (885 kg). Learn more: https://www.genielift.com/en/aerial-l....

Saturday, September 7, 2019

Talking Torque on the Genie® GTH™- 844®


GTH-844 74HP OPTION

The popular Genie GTH-844 rough terrain telehandler has a new Tier 4 74-hp engine option, offering full-sized performance at the right-sized price. An engine has a big impact on your machine's overall rental return on investment (ROIC), so we kept things simple and cost-effective with the updates to our Tier 4 GTH-844 machines. By optimizing the drive train, and utilizing the new high-torque 74-hp engine, we can offer you a less complex machine at a lower price point than a 99-hp engine option, saving you money right from the start.

  •  Right-side mount engine provides enhanced visibility
  • Ergonomic operator’s station features tiltable steering wheel, single-lever joystick control, and new gauge and switch packages.
  • Standard Dana Axels
  • Standard features include: a Quick-Attach system, low-profile tires, fenders (set of 4), rigging storage compartment, and lift shackle at boom tip
  • Proportional frame-leveling chassis — pick up or place loads on up to 10˚ side slopes
  • Multi-function proportional joystick control for fast, precise load positioning
  • Three selectable steering modes: front-wheel, coordinated and crab steer
  • Power-assisted steering
  • Turbocharged diesel engine
  • 3-speed forward and reverse Powershift transmission
  • High-efficiency/variable displacement hydraulic pump
  • ROPS/FOPS canopy (ISO compliant)
  • High output LED light package options
  • Rear Proximity Alarm options

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

Performing a Boom Lift Function Check - JLG Industries



Learn how to conduct a proper function check with boom controls. The function check ensures all functions operate smoothly with precise control. It provides the opportunity to visually inspect items that cannot be seen during the walk around, like boom sections and extendable axles. Some tips you’ll see include: Ensure the machine is on a firm, level surface in an area free of obstructions and that there is no load in the platform. Make sure there’s enough clearance around the machine and platform to safely operate all functions. The turntable lock should be disengaged. Always start with the ground controls. Watch the video for a more detailed overview.

Sunday, September 1, 2019

Commonly Used Fork Lift Attachments.


Commonly used fork lift attachments typically include a wide variety of attachments that serve a wide variety of purposes. This article will discuss a few of the more common examples which include side shifters, carton clamps, slip sheet attachments, multipurpose clamps, carpet poles, fork conditioners, roll clamps, and many more. Once you have finished this article you will have a thorough knowledge of each of these add-on parts.

The side shifter is one of the more commonly used fork lift attachments and it is a hydraulic attachment that allows for the lateral movement of the forks and backrest. This way the operator may place a load without having to move the truck in many cases. There is also the rotator which aids in the handling of tilted skids and special needs for the handling of certain materials. As the name suggests, it allows the tines to be rotated, which can also make dumping containers easier as well.

If you are someone who is constantly loading and unloading cargo of various sizes, then an automatic fork positioner may be one of the used fork lift attachments you have been waiting for. It is a hydraulic attachment that moves the tines together and apart without the operator having to constantly get in and out of the truck to reposition them manually.

Another one of the more useful attachments you may want to consider when looking for used fork lift attachments is the roll and barrel clip attachment. This piece of machinery is made to squeeze any material you are carrying, such as a barrel or paper roll, to make it easier to carry. Sometimes it is paired with a rotator as well, which can be used for a variety of purposes, such as to insert vertically stacked rolls of paper into the horizontal feed of a printing press.

Poles are also used fork lift attachments that are most often found in environments such as carpet warehouses. They can be used instead of forks to pick up and move large rolls of carpet quickly and efficiently. The clamp attachment is used to open and close around an object the operator is carrying which squeezes to pick it up.

It is most often used for the transportation of boxes, cartons and bales. The slip sheet attachment acts in a similar fashion except it uses a slip sheet to load off the forks. The drum handler attachment, as the name suggests, is used for the loading and unloading of drums by using a spring loaded jaw that grips the top of them.

These are just a few examples of the many different optional attachments that you will run into when looking at various used forklift attachments [http://www.usedforkliftguide.com/used-fork-lift-attachments.html]. The better you can understand the different attachments that are available, the easier your job will become as you can find the perfect attachment to help you move many different types of objects.

Pieter West travels the world on a regular basis and have written about numerous subjects. He has an extensive knowledge about, finances, DIY, parenting advice and many more subjects. You can find more of Pieter's articles regarding used forklifts at [http://www.usedforkliftguide.com/]

 By: Pieter West

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Pieter_West/369866

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3035603

Sunday, August 25, 2019

I80 Forklift Maintenance & Repair


Our technicians are factory certified and have many years experience in the field. We fix it right the first time, so you can get back on schedule.

In most cases we can have a mechanic on-site for emergency repairs the same or next day. Our repairs cover from minor part to complete engines. We can do everything from Basic Preventative Maintenance to 1000 Hour Full Services.

Repairs and servicing can also be done at our facility yard. We also supply new, used, or recap tires.

Parts: Depending on part

Repairs: $125.00 per hour

If there is a problem, we will find it and fix it !

Thursday, August 22, 2019

Genie MEWP Standards Webinar with Scott Owyen - May 2019


Watch Genie Senior Training Manager Scott Owyen present a webinar on the new MEWP Standards. To learn more about the new MEWP standards and safe use plan guidance, visit https://www.genielift.com/mewp-standard.

Monday, August 19, 2019

Genie GS-1930 Scissor Lift Tour - I-80 Forklift


Rick with I-80 Forklift shows off the cool Genie GS-1930.  These are available for sale, rent and they also repair them.   See more at http://www.i80forklift.com or call 707-451-5100.




Friday, August 16, 2019

JLG Compact Crawler Boom Hits Homerun at Camden Yards



The foul poles at Baltimore’s Camden Yards serve two functions. As transplants from the old Memorial Stadium, they bring more than three decades of prior history to the now 22-year-old baseball stadium. As vertical extensions of foul lines on the field they help umpires determine whether a fly ball is fair or foul during gameplay. For this reason, it is important that the poles are regularly painted and highly visible for day and night games. But the crisscross ironwork poles are 70 feet tall, which can present a challenge to those tasked with painting them.

Last year, Maryland Stadium Authority turned to Rentals Unlimited, Inc. in Clarksburg, Maryland, and the JLG® X700AJ Compact Crawler Boom for help. According to Jim Joyce, sales manager of the equipment and truck rental company and long-term JLG customer, painting the foul poles challenged his company to recommend a piece of equipment with a footprint small enough to fit on the ball field’s warning track and offer enough reach to access the top of the poles.

“Running a machine across the actual playing field was out of the question,” he said. “So, we measured the warning track and were confident the Compact Crawler Boom would easily fit on the track and provide access to the poles.”

Boom’s compact size meets challenge
With a width of just 3 feet 3 inches, a 440-pound platform capacity and non-marking tracks, the X700AJ proved to be the perfect choice for the ballpark application, enabling contractors to apply two coats of yellow paint top to bottom on each of the two poles.

“Everyone who saw the machine before we put it to work was surprised by its capabilities,” said Joyce. “I think it was the boom’s size that threw them. It weighs just 7,000 pounds, but extends to 70 feet, and it’s easy to operate.”

The compact size and vertical reach of the X700AJ has made it a profitable addition to the fleet at Rentals Unlimited. “The crawler is a unique piece of equipment. Its compact size means it’s easy to transport and once on the job site, it will go through 39-inch doorways and fit into other hard-to-reach areas. The machine is self-leveling, so if it’s on uneven ground, it will level itself. And, it’s able to climb up and down steps, with rubber tracks that won’t harm sensitive flooring or landscaping.”

In addition, the X700AJ is environmentally friendly with an optional Lithium-ion battery for cleaner, greener operation. Dual power onboard—gas or electric engines, accompanied by an electric AC motor—are standard to reduce noise and emissions in public spaces. Other features include a hydraulic jib for greater reach, rotation of platform and a zero-turn radius with counter rotation.

Versatility leads to interesting assignments
The versatility of the machine has taken Joyce and his company on some interesting assignments beyond the Camden Yards application. “We took it down a flight of steps and through some doors at a facility that housed an Olympic-size pool in the Washington, D.C., area,” he said. “Once inside, we drove the boom down inside the empty pool and used the leveling feature so we could safely position the machine on the sloped bottom of the pool. This provided access to the roof about 60 feet above the pool and enabled workers to replace several rusted roof panels.”

Joyce described another application in which the machine climbed a long flight of stairs and drove through a 42-inch door in a large medical facility. “And then there was the large retail store in Virginia. The Compact Crawler Boom was the only piece of equipment small enough to fit through the front doors and still offer enough reach to allow workers to wash the large windows positioned well above the doors. This machine just opens up a whole avenue of opportunities for the rental business, and its success seems to have a snowball effect.

“That’s the story here,” Joyce continues. “Expand your fleet with the purchase of a Compact Crawler Boom and open up new doors. And the great thing is, they don’t have to be big doors – just 39 inches and you can move right through them.”

Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Next Warehouse Forklift Training will be Friday, Sept 6th. 8 am - Vacaville office



Join our Warehouse Forklift Training class to be held at I-80 Forklift office Friday, Sept 6th at 8:00 am. Cost: $140.00

Class size is limited, so reserve your spot today! Phone: (707) 451-5100

Saturday, August 10, 2019

Forklift Certification By I-80 Forklift



Get you warehouse forklift certification from the professionals at I-80 Forklift. See more at http://www.i80forklift.com or call 707-451-5100.

Wednesday, August 7, 2019

Aerial Lift Operator Familiarization Training Part 3 (Scissor Lift)



Part 3 of our Aerial Lift Familiarization Tutorials shows how to conduct familiarization training on an scissor lifts. See Part 1 for a review of the familiarization documents and Part 2 for an aerial boomlift example. For more information call 1-800-643-1144 or visit us online at www.ivestraining.com.

Sunday, August 4, 2019

Thursday, August 1, 2019

AccessReady XR: Virtual Reality Training from JLG


AccessReady XR is an advanced training tool that allows operators to safely work in challenging, real-world situations to develop their skills. This virtual reality training package brings the job site environment, access equipment and required skills together in an easy-to-use format. It’s a great option for rental companies and AccessReady trainers looking to give their trainees more hands-on training time.

Monday, July 29, 2019

Introducing the JLG® AccessReady XR™ Virtual Reality Training Simulator


In this video, Rick Smith, director of global product training at JLG, introduces you to our virtual reality training simulator. The AccessReady XR™ simulator gives you the power to train your employees and customers using the most advanced boom lift training right in your own facility.

Thursday, July 25, 2019

Truck Driver Needed

WANTED: Class A Truck Driver

 Hauling Construction Equipment in Northern and Central California

CONTACT: I80 Forklift, Vacaville CA

Call: 707-451-5100

Clean California DMV Record Required

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

Similar, Not the Same

 

You can settle for a scissor that does the job. Or you can choose from two JLG® scissor lines that do what other brands can’t. Consider our full range of machines—from the value R to the premium ES—and get the performance you expect with smart, simple technology that maximizes your uptime.

Learn more:  https://www.jlg.com/en/destination/similar-not-same


Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Truck Driver Needed

WANTED: Class A Truck Driver

 Hauling Construction Equipment in Northern and Central California

CONTACT: I80 Forklift, Vacaville CA

Call: 707-451-5100

Clean California DMV Record Required

Sunday, July 14, 2019

Technical Training Grants offer benefits to employees and rental businesses

At Interstate 80 Forklift in Vacaville, Calif., Michelle Strand, president, needed to hire another technician to keep up with demand.

“Our goal was to hire a veteran, so we attended a job fair at our local Air Force base. Most of the veterans we talked with had working experience as a technician, but not many had experience working on heavy construction equipment. We knew from the start that we would need to devote a lot of time to their training,” she says.

After she found a veteran who would be a good fit for her company, she hired him and began on-the-job training. After eight months, “we felt it was time to strengthen his foundation skills and send him to Skytrak Service Training offered by JLG University. This is where the Technical Training Grant from the ARA Foundation came in and really helped offset that cost. It was perfect timing,” says Strand, who applied for and received the grant during the third-quarter distribution.

While she knew the grant would help her pay for that important technical training, she never anticipated the added value it would give her employee and her business.

“It was so great. He came back and was so grateful to us for sending him to the class. He said he learned so much and it really connected all of the dots for him. He mentioned how much he was looking forward to attending the next class so he could take his skills to the next level. It was rewarding to hear that. It shows how much this grant helped us support our employee, which, in turn, is an investment in our company’s future. He has come back more excited, with more energy and more knowledge. As he grows and advances in his skills, that will help us be a better rental and service operation,” Strand says.

Chris Wright, president of House of Rental, Skokie, Ill., also benefited from a grant during the third-quarter distribution. Always a strong proponent of employee training, he says, “It’s nice that the ARA Foundation does reimbursements on technical training. That means we can send our employees to more training or more expensive technical training.”

Thanks to receiving a Technical Training Grant, Wright’s employee was able to attend aerial lift operator and instructor training from Skyjack.

“He was offered in-depth, two-day, hands-on and classroom training. Now he has come back and has given all of our employees the current specifications and how-tos of every piece of lift equipment that we own. It makes us more knowledgeable, more competitive and safer,” Wright says.

In essence, the grant and the training provided his company “three levels of training,” Wright says. “Our employee has been trained and now trains our other employees. They, in turn, train our customers. It makes our business a better rental company.”

Strand and Wright are just two of the many rental operators who have benefited by applying for and receiving these grants.

Learn how these grants can help your operation. Go to ARAfoundation.com/go/TechGrants. Don’t delay. To be eligible for the fourth-quarter distribution, rental business owners must apply by the Dec. 31, 2018, deadline.

For questions, contact Joann Lay at 800-334-2177, ext. 265, or joann.lay@ararental.org.

An official publication of the American Rental Association.
Produced by Rental Management Group. Copyright © 2018 Rental Pulse all rights reserved
At Interstate 80 Forklift in Vacaville, Calif., Michelle Strand, president, needed to hire another technician to keep up with demand.

“Our goal was to hire a veteran, so we attended a job fair at our local Air Force base. Most of the veterans we talked with had working experience as a technician, but not many had experience working on heavy construction equipment. We knew from the start that we would need to devote a lot of time to their training,” she says.

After she found a veteran who would be a good fit for her company, she hired him and began on-the-job training. After eight months, “we felt it was time to strengthen his foundation skills and send him to Skytrak Service Training offered by JLG University. This is where the Technical Training Grant from the ARA Foundation came in and really helped offset that cost. It was perfect timing,” says Strand, who applied for and received the grant during the third-quarter distribution.

While she knew the grant would help her pay for that important technical training, she never anticipated the added value it would give her employee and her business.

“It was so great. He came back and was so grateful to us for sending him to the class. He said he learned so much and it really connected all of the dots for him. He mentioned how much he was looking forward to attending the next class so he could take his skills to the next level. It was rewarding to hear that. It shows how much this grant helped us support our employee, which, in turn, is an investment in our company’s future. He has come back more excited, with more energy and more knowledge. As he grows and advances in his skills, that will help us be a better rental and service operation,” Strand says.

Chris Wright, president of House of Rental, Skokie, Ill., also benefited from a grant during the third-quarter distribution. Always a strong proponent of employee training, he says, “It’s nice that the ARA Foundation does reimbursements on technical training. That means we can send our employees to more training or more expensive technical training.”

Thanks to receiving a Technical Training Grant, Wright’s employee was able to attend aerial lift operator and instructor training from Skyjack.

“He was offered in-depth, two-day, hands-on and classroom training. Now he has come back and has given all of our employees the current specifications and how-tos of every piece of lift equipment that we own. It makes us more knowledgeable, more competitive and safer,” Wright says.

In essence, the grant and the training provided his company “three levels of training,” Wright says. “Our employee has been trained and now trains our other employees. They, in turn, train our customers. It makes our business a better rental company.”

Strand and Wright are just two of the many rental operators who have benefited by applying for and receiving these grants.

Learn how these grants can help your operation. Go to ARAfoundation.com/go/TechGrants. Don’t delay. To be eligible for the fourth-quarter distribution, rental business owners must apply by the Dec. 31, 2018, deadline.

For questions, contact Joann Lay at 800-334-2177, ext. 265, or joann.lay@ararental.org.

An official publication of the American Rental Association.
Produced by Rental Management Group. Copyright © 2018 Rental Pulse all rights reserved

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Conducting a Boom Lift Walk Around Inspection



The walk around inspection ensures there is no visible damage to your boom lift. A pre-operational check of your machine must be conducted before using it each day or when changing operators. Always follow the daily inspection procedure in your manual. Some other helpful tips include: The machine must remain off during inspection. Check the fuel level in the tank or the charge in the batteries. Ensure all manuals are in the storage holder. Check to make sure there are no missing parts, that they’re securely fastened and that there’s no visible damage or excessive wear. If you find a discrepancy or damage to your machine, remove it from service and alert the proper maintenance personnel. Watch the video for a more detailed overview.

Thursday, July 4, 2019

Not Your Average History of JLG



Since the days of Woodstock and the lunar landing, we’ve designed safe, productive solutions for the job site. But we didn’t stop there. See what we’ve been up to for the past 50 years while you’ve been keeping busy on the job.

Saturday, June 29, 2019

Genie® Tech Pro™ Link Walkaround


With the Genie® Tech Pro™ Link diagnostics tool, everything you need to know is right in the palm of your hand. It allows users to monitor a machine's gauges, including engine temperature, oil pressure, fuel levels and battery voltage, calibrate the machine, make speed adjustments during pre-operation inspection, get service alerts and reminders, track maintenance intervals, receive fault code information and so much more - all from the palm of your technician's hand.

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Genie machine vs scaffold : Lighting maintenance work



Genie machines’ superior features provide better solution in reaching greater heights whilst they are proven to be safe, more productive and easy to use

Sunday, June 23, 2019

JLG Scissor ES Training


This is for informational purposes only. This should only be used as a tool to aid in a complete aerial training program conducted by a certified aerial trainer. Please contact APi Supply Lifts for availability and pricing for our ANSI 92.3-92.6 training programs. APi Supply Lifts does not claim ownership or rights to this video.

Thursday, June 20, 2019

The Genie GTH™-1256


The Genie GTH-1256 telehandler delivers industry-leading performance with a large lifting capacity, high reach and compact maneuverability. This telehandler is built to perform, featuring a military grade chassis design, standard Quick-Attach™ system and auxiliary hydraulics, a right-side mount engine and a rear-mounted boom support for excellent visibility.

  • Ergonomic cab design with excellent visibility over the boom in transport position
  • Standard Aux hydraulics and Quick-Attach™ carriage system for attachment flexibility
  • Proportional frame-leveling chassis — pick up or place loads on up to 7˚ side slopes
  • Multi-function proportional joystick control for fast, precise load positioning
  • Full-time 4-wheel drive and 4-wheel steer
  • Three selectable steering modes: front-wheel, coordinated and crab steer
  • DEUTZ 154 hp or Perkins 148 hp Tier 4i engine
  • Variable speed hydrostat transmission
  • Side engine mount for easy service access
Maximum Lift Height 56 ft (17.07 m)
Maximum Forward Reach 42 ft (12.80 m)
Maximum Lift Capacity 12,000 lbs (5,443 kg)
Power Source Deutz 4.1TCD turbo charged diesel, Tier 4i 154 hp (115 kW)
Perkins 1204E-E44TA turbo charged diesel, Tier 4i 147 hp (110 kW)
Drive Speed 18 mph (29.0 km/h)
Weight* 36,600 lbs (16,602 kg)
* Weight will vary depending on options and/or country standards.

Monday, June 17, 2019

Truck Driver Needed

WANTED: Class A Truck Driver

 Hauling Construction Equipment in Northern and Central California

CONTACT: I80 Forklift, Vacaville CA

Call: 707-451-5100

Clean California DMV Record Required

Friday, June 14, 2019

WANTED: Heavy Equipment Technician


Heavy Equipment Technician Needed at I-80 Forklift in Vacaville CA

Minimum requirements are a 2-year mechanic experience history and a clean California DMV record.

For more information call 707-451-5100

Tuesday, June 11, 2019

Safety Zone, Simulating Heights


Peggy Smedley is joined by Richard Smith, senior director, global product training, JLG, to talk about the need for greater safety when working at heights—and how virtual reality might be the solution.

Saturday, June 8, 2019

Product Demo: Genie Z™-60/37FE Articulating Boom Lift: Hybrid System - ANSI



With the Genie Z-60/37FE boom, equipped with a Fuel Electric Hybrid System, we give our customers the opportunity to choose either from a full electric machine or a diesel powered machine, environmental consciousness with lower cost of operation. 2 modes of operation: Full-electric: full-day, emission-free on a single charge, Diesel driven generator: one week of run time with a single tank of diesel.

Wednesday, June 5, 2019

Forklift Broken Down? Call I-80 Forklift - We'll fix it right the first time so you can get back to work.


Based in Solano County, centrally located between the Bay Area and Sacramento, Interstate 80 Forklift is your top choice for all your forklift needs. Interstate 80 Forklift offers competitive pricing on new and used forklifts. As well we have a large inventory of parts ready to ship or be installed. We employ top-notch mechanics who are experienced and ready to serve you.

Repairs and servicing can also be done in our shop conveniently located in Vacaville, California. We also supply new, used or recap tires.

NEW!!! Running a night shift that is using a forklift? Don't get behind schedule because of an unexpected break-down. Let Interstate 80 Forklift be your back-up plan. Call and schedule an "on-call" mechanic for those off hour times.

I-80 Forklift
Phone: (707) 451-5100

Sunday, June 2, 2019

Save Time and Money with the JLG® Bolt-On Fall Arrest System



Work 180o around and up to 6 ft away from your boom lift platform with the new Bolt-On Fall Arrest System from JLG. A cost-effective alternative to buying a whole new boom platform, this system consists of two large steel brackets securing a 6-ft cable with a ring that can move from one end of the cable to the other. Attaching the lanyard to the ring improves maneuverability and allows the operator to perform tasks outside of the platform.

Learn more: https://www.jlg.com/en/news-events/pr...

Thursday, May 30, 2019

OSHA Standard1926 for Material Handling

 It's important to know the Federal OSHA Standards for Material Handling and Lifting.

• Part Number:     1926
• Part Title:     Safety and Health Regulations for Construction
• Subpart:     H
• Subpart Title:     Materials Handling, Storage, Use, and Disposal
• Standard Number:     1926.251
• Title:     Rigging equipment for material handling.
• Applicable Standards:     1910.184(a); 1910.184(c)(2); 1910.184(c)(3); 1910.184(c)(5); 1910.184(c)(7); 1910.184(c)(10); 1910.184(c)(11); 1910.184(c)(12); 1910.184(f)(2); 1910.184(f)(3); 1910.184(f)(4); 1910.184(d)
• GPO Source:     e-CFR

1926.251(a)

    General.

1926.251(a)(1)

    Rigging equipment for material handling shall be inspected prior to use on each shift and as necessary during its use to ensure that it is safe. Defective rigging equipment shall be removed from service.

1926.251(a)(2)

    Employers must ensure that rigging equipment:

1926.251(a)(2)(i)

    Has permanently affixed and legible identification markings as prescribed by the manufacturer that indicate the recommended safe working load;

1926.251(a)(2)(ii)

    Not be loaded in excess of its recommended safe working load as prescribed on the identification markings by the manufacturer; and

1926.251(a)(2)(iii)

    Not be used without affixed, legible identification markings, required by paragraph (a)(2)(i) of this section.

1926.251(a)(3)

    Rigging equipment, when not in use, shall be removed from the immediate work area so as not to present a hazard to employees.

1926.251(a)(4)

    Special custom design grabs, hooks, clamps, or other lifting accessories, for such units as modular panels, prefabricated structures and similar materials, shall be marked to indicate the safe working loads and shall be proof-tested prior to use to 125 percent of their rated load.

1926.251(a)(5)

    "Scope." This section applies to slings used in conjunction with other material handling equipment for the movement of material by hoisting, in employments covered by this part. The types of slings covered are those made from alloy steel chain, wire rope, metal mesh, natural or synthetic fiber rope (conventional three strand construction), and synthetic web (nylon, polyester, and polypropylene).

1926.251(a)(6)

    "Inspections." Each day before being used, the sling and all fastenings and attachments shall be inspected for damage or defects by a competent person designated by the employer. Additional inspections shall be performed during sling use, where service conditions warrant. Damaged or defective slings shall be immediately removed from service.

1926.251(b)

    Alloy steel chains.

1926.251(b)(1)

    Welded alloy steel chain slings shall have permanently affixed durable identification stating size, grade, rated capacity, and sling manufacturer.

1926.251(b)(2)

    Hooks, rings, oblong links, pear-shaped links, welded or mechanical coupling links, or other attachments, when used with alloy steel chains, shall have a rated capacity at least equal to that of the chain.

1926.251(b)(3)

    Job or shop hooks and links, or makeshift fasteners, formed from bolts, rods, etc., or other such attachments, shall not be used.

1926.251(b)(4)

    Employers must not use alloy steel-chain slings with loads in excess of the rated capacities (i.e., working load limits) indicated on the sling by permanently affixed and legible identification markings prescribed by the manufacturer.

1926.251(b)(5)

    Whenever wear at any point of any chain link exceeds that shown in Table H–1, the assembly shall be removed from service.

1926.251(b)(6)

    "Inspections."

1926.251(b)(6)(i)

    In addition to the inspection required by other paragraphs of this section, a thorough periodic inspection of alloy steel chain slings in use shall be made on a regular basis, to be determined on the basis of (A) frequency of sling use; (B) severity of service conditions; (C) nature of lifts being made; and (D) experience gained on the service life of slings used in similar circumstances. Such inspections shall in no event be at intervals greater than once every 12 months.

1926.251(b)(6)(ii)

    The employer shall make and maintain a record of the most recent month in which each alloy steel chain sling was thoroughly inspected, and shall make such record available for examination.

1926.251(c)

    Wire rope.

1926.251(c)(1)

    Employers must not use improved plow-steel wire rope and wire-rope slings with loads in excess of the rated capacities (i.e., working load limits) indicated on the sling by permanently affixed and legible identification markings prescribed by the manufacturer.

1926.251(c)(2)

    Protruding ends of strands in splices on slings and bridles shall be covered or blunted.

1926.251(c)(3)

    Wire rope shall not be secured by knots, except on haul back lines on scrapers.

1926.251(c)(4)

    The following limitations shall apply to the use of wire rope:

1926.251(c)(4)(i)

    An eye splice made in any wire rope shall have not less than three full tucks. However, this requirement shall not operate to preclude the use of another form of splice or connection which can be shown to be as efficient and which is not otherwise prohibited.

1926.251(c)(4)(ii)

    Except for eye splices in the ends of wires and for endless rope slings, each wire rope used in hoisting or lowering, or in pulling loads, shall consist of one continuous piece without knot or splice.

1926.251(c)(4)(iii)

    Eyes in wire rope bridles, slings, or bull wires shall not be formed by wire rope clips or knots.

1926.251(c)(4)(iv)

    Wire rope shall not be used if, in any length of eight diameters, the total number of visible broken wires exceeds 10 percent of the total number of wires, or if the rope shows other signs of excessive wear, corrosion, or defect.

1926.251(c)(5)

    When U-bolt wire rope clips are used to form eyes, Table H–2 shall be used to determine the number and spacing of clips.

1926.251(c)(5)(i)

    When used for eye splices, the U-bolt shall be applied so that the "U" section is in contact with the dead end of the rope.

1926.251(c)(5)(ii)

    [Reserved]

1926.251(c)(6)

    Slings shall not be shortened with knots or bolts or other makeshift devices.

1926.251(c)(7)

    Sling legs shall not be kinked.

1926.251(c)(8)

    Slings used in a basket hitch shall have the loads balanced to prevent slippage.

1926.251(c)(9)

    Slings shall be padded or protected from the sharp edges of their loads.

1926.251(c)(10)

    Hands or fingers shall not be placed between the sling and its load while the sling is being tightened around the load.

1926.251(c)(11)

    Shock loading is prohibited.

1926.251(c)(12)

    A sling shall not be pulled from under a load when the load is resting on the sling.

1926.251(c)(13)

    "Minimum sling lengths."

1926.251(c)(13)(i)

    Cable laid and 6 X 19 and 6 X 37 slings shall have minimum clear length of wire rope 10 times the component rope diameter between splices, sleeves or end fittings.

1926.251(c)(13)(ii)

    Braided slings shall have a minimum clear length of wire rope 40 times the component rope diameter between the loops or end fittings.

1926.251(c)(13)(iii)

    Cable laid grommets, strand laid grommets and endless slings shall have a minimum circumferential length of 96 times their body diameter.

1926.251(c)(14)

    "Safe operating temperatures." Fiber core wire rope slings of all grades shall be permanently removed from service if they are exposed to temperatures in excess of 200 deg. F (93.33 deg. C). When nonfiber core wire rope slings of any grade are used at temperatures above 400 deg. F (204.44 deg. C) or below minus 60 deg. F (15.55 deg. C), recommendations of the sling manufacturer regarding use at that temperature shall be followed.

1926.251(c)(15)

    "End attachments."

1926.251(c)(15)(i)

    Welding of end attachments, except covers to thimbles, shall be performed prior to the assembly of the sling.

1926.251(c)(15)(ii)

    All welded end attachments shall not be used unless proof tested by the manufacturer or equivalent entity at twice their rated capacity prior to initial use. The employer shall retain a certificate of proof test, and make it available for examination.

1926.251(c)(16)

    Wire rope slings shall have permanently affixed, legible identification markings stating size, rated capacity for the type(s) of hitch(es) used and the angle upon which it is based, and the number of legs if more than one.

1926.251(d)

    Natural rope, and synthetic fiber.

1926.251(d)(1)

    Employers must not use natural- and synthetic-fiber rope slings with loads in excess of the rated capacities (i.e., working load limits) indicated on the sling by permanently affixed and legible identification markings prescribed by the manufacturer.

1926.251(d)(2)

    All splices in rope slings provided by the employer shall be made in accordance with fiber rope manufacturers recommendations.

1926.251(d)(2)(i)

    In manila rope, eye splices shall contain at least three full tucks, and short splices shall contain at least six full tucks (three on each side of the center line of the splice).

1926.251(d)(2)(ii)

    In layed synthetic fiber rope, eye splices shall contain at least four full tucks, and short splices shall contain at least eight full tucks (four on each side of the center line of the splice).

1926.251(d)(2)(iii)

    Strand end tails shall not be trimmed short (flush with the surface of the rope) immediately adjacent to the full tucks. This precaution applies to both eye and short splices and all types of fiber rope. For fiber ropes under 1-inch diameter, the tails shall project at least six rope diameters beyond the last full tuck. For fiber ropes 1-inch diameter and larger, the tails shall project at least 6 inches beyond the last full tuck. In applications where the projecting tails may be objectionable, the tails shall be tapered and spliced into the body of the rope using at least two additional tucks (which will require a tail length of approximately six rope diameters beyond the last full tuck).

1926.251(d)(2)(iv)

    For all eye splices, the eye shall be sufficiently large to provide an included angle of not greater than 60 deg. at the splice when the eye is placed over the load or support.

1926.251(d)(2)(v)

    Knots shall not be used in lieu of splices.

1926.251(d)(3)

    "Safe operating temperatures." Natural and synthetic fiber rope slings, except for wet frozen slings, may be used in a temperature range from minus 20 deg. F (-28.88 deg. C) to plus 180 deg. F (82.2 deg. C) without decreasing the working load limit. For operations outside this temperature range and for wet frozen slings, the sling manufacturer's recommendations shall be followed.

1926.251(d)(4)

    "Splicing." Spliced fiber rope slings shall not be used unless they have been spliced in accordance with the following minimum requirements and in accordance with any additional recommendations of the manufacturer:

1926.251(d)(4)(i)

    In manila rope, eye splices shall consist of at least three full tucks, and short splices shall consist of at least six full tucks, three on each side of the splice center line.

1926.251(d)(4)(ii)

    In synthetic fiber rope, eye splices shall consist of at least four full tucks, and short splices shall consist of at least eight full tucks, four on each side of the center line.

1926.251(d)(4)(iii)

    Strand end tails shall not be trimmed flush with the surface of the rope immediately adjacent to the full tucks. This applies to all types of fiber rope and both eye and short splices. For fiber rope under 1 inch (2.54 cm) in diameter, the tail shall project at least six rope diameters beyond the last full tuck. For fiber rope 1 inch (2.54 cm) in diameter and larger, the tail shall project at least 6 inches (15.24 cm) beyond the last full tuck. Where a projecting tail interferes with the use of the sling, the tail shall be tapered and spliced into the body of the rope using at lest two additional tucks (which will require a tail length of approximately six rope diameters beyond the last full tuck).

1926.251(d)(4)(iv)

    Fiber rope slings shall have a minimum clear length of rope between eye splices equal to 10 times the rope diameter.

1926.251(d)(4)(v)

    Knots shall not be used in lieu of splices.

1926.251(d)(4)(vi)

    Clamps not designed specifically for fiber ropes shall not be used for splicing.

1926.251(d)(4)(vii)

    For all eye splices, the eye shall be of such size to provide an included angle of not greater than 60 degrees at the splice when the eye is placed over the load or support.

1926.251(d)(5)

    "End attachments." Fiber rope slings shall not be used if end attachments in contact with the rope have sharp edges or projections.

1926.251(d)(6)

    "Removal from service." Natural and synthetic fiber rope slings shall be immediately removed from service if any of the following conditions are present:

1926.251(d)(6)(i)

    Abnormal wear.

1926.251(d)(6)(ii)

    Powdered fiber between strands.

1926.251(d)(6)(iii)

    Broken or cut fibers.

1926.251(d)(6)(iv)

    Variations in the size or roundness of strands.

1926.251(d)(6)(v)

    Discoloration or rotting.

1926.251(d)(6)(vi)

    Distortion of hardware in the sling.

1926.251(d)(7)

    Employers must use natural- and synthetic-fiber rope slings that have permanently affixed and legible identification markings that state the rated capacity for the type(s) of hitch(es) used and the angle upon which it is based, type of fiber material, and the number of legs if more than one.

1926.251(e)

    Synthetic webbing (nylon, polyester, and polypropylene).

1926.251(e)(1)

    The employer shall have each synthetic web sling marked or coded to show:

1926.251(e)(1)(i)

    Name or trademark of manufacturer.

1926.251(e)(1)(ii)

    Rated capacities for the type of hitch.

1926.251(e)(1)(iii)

    Type of material.

1926.251(e)(2)

    Rated capacity shall not be exceeded.

1926.251(e)(3)

    "Webbing." Synthetic webbing shall be of uniform thickness and width and selvage edges shall not be split from the webbing's width.

1926.251(e)(4)

    "Fittings." Fittings shall be:

1926.251(e)(4)(i)

    Of a minimum breaking strength equal to that of the sling; and

1926.251(e)(4)(ii)

    Free of all sharp edges that could in any way damage the webbing.

1926.251(e)(5)

    "Attachment of end fittings to webbing and formation of eyes." Stitching shall be the only method used to attach end fittings to webbing and to form eyes. The thread shall be in an even pattern and contain a sufficient number of stitches to develop the full breaking strength of the sling.

1926.251(e)(6)

    "Environmental conditions." When synthetic web slings are used, the following precautions shall be taken:

1926.251(e)(6)(i)

    Nylon web slings shall not be used where fumes, vapors, sprays, mists or liquids of acids or phenolics are present.

1926.251(e)(6)(ii)

    Polyester and polypropylene web slings shall not be used where fumes, vapors, sprays, mists or liquids of caustics are present.

1926.251(e)(6)(iii)

    Web slings with aluminum fittings shall not be used where fumes, vapors, sprays, mists or liquids of caustics are present.

1926.251(e)(7)

    "Safe operating temperatures." Synthetic web slings of polyester and nylon shall not be used at temperatures in excess of 180 deg. F (82.2 deg. C). Polypropylene web slings shall not be used at temperatures in excess of 200 deg. F (93.33 deg. C).

1926.251(e)(8)

    "Removal from service." Synthetic web slings shall be immediately removed from service if any of the following conditions are present:

1926.251(e)(8)(i)

    Acid or caustic burns;

1926.251(e)(8)(ii)

    Melting or charring of any part of the sling surface;

1926.251(e)(8)(iii)

    Snags, punctures, tears or cuts;

1926.251(e)(8)(iv)

    Broken or worn stitches; or

1926.251(e)(8)(v)

    Distortion of fittings.

1926.251(f)

    Shackles and hooks.

1926.251(f)(1)

    Employers must not use shackles with loads in excess of the rated capacities (i.e., working load limits) indicated on the shackle by permanently affixed and legible identification markings prescribed by the manufacturer.

1926.251(f)(2)

    The manufacturer's recommendations shall be followed in determining the safe working loads of the various sizes and types of specific and identifiable hooks. All hooks for which no applicable manufacturer's recommendations are available shall be tested to twice the intended safe working load before they are initially put into use. The employer shall maintain a record of the dates and results of such tests.


 TABLE H - 1. -- MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE WEAR
                 AT ANY POINT OF LINK

_______________________________________
                 |
 Chain size,     |  Maximum allowable
   (inches)      |      wear (inch)
_________________|_____________________
                 |
1/4 ............ |        3/64
3/8 ............ |        5/64
1/2 ............ |        7/64
5/8 ............ |        9/64
3/4 ............ |        5/32
7/8 ............ |       11/64
  1 ............ |        3/16
1 1/8 .......... |        7/32
1 1/4 .......... |         1/4
1 3/8 .......... |        9/32
1 1/2 .......... |        5/16
1 3/4 .......... |       11/32
_________________|______________________


  TABLE H - 2. -- NUMBER AND SPACING OF
                   U-BOLT WIRE ROPE CLIPS
____________________________________________________
                      |                   |
Improved plow steel,  |  Number of clips  |
  rope diameter       |___________________| Minimum
     (inches)         |        |          | spacing
                      |  Drop  |   Other  | (inches)
                      | forged | material |
______________________|________|__________|_________
                      |        |          |
1/2 ................. |     3  |       4  |      3
5/8 ................. |     3  |       4  |  3 3/4
3/4 ................. |     4  |       5  |  4 1/2
7/8 ................. |     4  |       5  |  5 1/4
1 ................... |     5  |       6  |      6
1 1/8 ............... |     6  |       6  |  6 3/4
1 1/4 ............... |     6  |       7  |  7 1/2
1 3/8 ............... |     7  |       7  |  8 1/4
1 1/2 ............... |     7  |       8  |      9
______________________|________|__________|_________

    [44 FR 8577, Feb. 9, 1979; 44 FR 20940, Apr. 6, 1979, as amended at 58 FR 35173; June 30, 1993; 76 FR 33611, June 8, 2011; 77 FR 23118, April 18, 2012; 78 FR 11092 February 15, 2013 ]

Next Standard (1926.252)

Regulations (Standards - 29 CFR) - Table of Contents
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Source: https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=10686